Holidaymakers who post information about trips on Facebook face having insurance claims rejected if their home is targeted by burglars while they are away

Holidaymakers who advertise trip online could lose insurance cover

Announcing your big vacation on Facebook or posting a series of beach selfies while you’re away can be the highlight of a holiday for some.

But sunseekers are being warned that it could also invalidate their home insurance if they get burgled while they are away.

Insurers are increasingly checking people’s social media accounts following a break-in to see if they announced that they would be away from the property, and are using it as a reason not to pay out.

Holidaymakers who announce they are going on a two-week trip or regularly post selfies from the beach on Facebook while they are away could find their insurer refusing to pay out if they are burgled

Holidaymakers who announce they are going on a two-week trip or regularly post selfies from the beach on Facebook while they are away could find their insurer refusing to pay out if they are burgled

This is because most insurers have a ‘reasonable care’ clause in contracts so firms don’t have to offer up cash if they can prove people weren’t careful enough in protecting their possessions.

In the past this was used in cases of burglary where doors or windows were left unlocked or open, but increasingly it is being used against holidaymakers who advertise their vacation online.

Police forces have repeatedly warned that would-be thieves will check social media to see whether property owners have said they will be away, before striking while nobody is home.

Families that post pictures of themselves on sun loungers, or announce they are on the first day of a two-week trip could be deemed to be helping criminals.

Most firms include 'reasonable care' clause in contracts, meaning they are not liable if people did not protect their property, and are now using against people who advertise breaks online

Most firms include ‘reasonable care’ clause in contracts, meaning they are not liable if people did not protect their property, and are now using against people who advertise breaks online

Police have repeatedly warned that would-be thieves will often check social networks in order to establish that people are out of their homes before striking

Police have repeatedly warned that would-be thieves will often check social networks in order to establish that people are out of their homes before striking

A spokesman for the Financial Ombudsman Service said: ‘It’s possible that your insurance cover could be affected if you explicitly announce your plans on social media.

‘You wouldn’t put a poster up on your front lawn saying you’re going on holiday.’

The Association of British Insurers also warned home owners to ‘think carefully about what you put on social media’.

 

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